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Coriander Seeds

$6.95

1 ounce

Kitchen Witch Herbs, Pagan Chef Gift for Culinary Spells and Altar, Home Apothecary Supply, Magical Herb

5 in stock

Description

Botanical Name: Coriandrum sativum

Common Names: Coriander, Cilantro, Dhania, Dhanyak, Chinese Parsley

Format: Dried, Whole Seed

Medicinally, Coriander is known as anti-inflammatory, carminative, and digestive.

Magically, Coriander is associated with love, lust, and fertility.

Both Pliny the Elder and Hippocrates recommended coriander for food medicine. Of course, by the time these ancient herbalists started singing its praises, coriander was already a world traveling superstar. The earliest stash of coriander has been found in a Neolithic B level of the Nahal Hemar Cave in Israel, but it was also found in the tomb of Tutankhamen. The Chinese, the Spanish conquistadors, Bronze Age invaders, randy Renaissance winos… Ancient Israelites used it in their cooking, and even the Book of Numbers in the Bible talks about it. This plant has gotten around.

For the full rundown of Coriander, including its history, a complete list of magical and medicinal properties, holistic uses, and simple spells, visit http://www.witchygypsymomma.com/magical-and-medicinal-herbs

Coriandrum sativum is an herbaceous annual in the Apiaceae family native to parts of Europe, Africa, and Asia. In the United States, the herb’s leaves are commonly referred to as cilantro and the dried seeds as coriander. Coriander seed is a common spice used in many cultures throughout the world. The seeds are warming and have a slightly nutty and citrus flavor that are intensified when roasted. Coriander seeds can be ground fresh before use or kept whole and added to marinades, sauces, and rubs.

Coriander is a spice that has been used in the Mediterranean and Asia for thousands of years and is now widely cultivated and available in the West. Traditionally, it was used to support healthy digestion and was often added to beans or other hard to digest dishes due to its carminative qualities. Further, it is well known as a flavoring for liquor, beers, and various soups, sauces, and meats.

Coriander is a hardy annual native to the Mediterranean and Asia with compound lower leaves that are somewhat round and lobed, yet have finely divided, lacy upper leaves. These leaves, called ‘cilantro,’ are abundant in most supermarkets. The small white umbelliferous flowers typify the Apiaceae or Carrot family. All parts of the plant are used, yet the most common are the leaves (cilantro) and fruits, or seeds, which are referred to as ‘coriander’.

First mentioned in Sanskrit texts in India seven thousand years ago, coriander is truly an ancient spice. The seed was found in Egyptian tombs and also discovered in Bronze Age ruins (ca 3200–600 BCE) on the Aegean Islands. The ancient Greek and Roman physicians Hippocrates, Paracelsus, Dioscorides, and the naturalist Pliny the Elder were all quite familiar with this spice. In fact Pliny suggested that the best coriander of his time was from Egypt. The ancients employed coriander as a meat preservative amongst many other things. In China it was utilized for its carminative and culinary purposes for thousands of years as well. Often the root was cooked as a vegetable.

Used as a culinary spice in India, coriander is a main ingredient in Indian curry powder alongside spices such as turmeric, fenugreek, cumin, and chili. In some of the northern parts of Europe and in Russia, coriander is used to flavor alcoholic liquors, in particular, gin. Belgian-style white beer is often brewed with coriander and orange peel which gives it the characteristic spicy citrus flavor. Further, the sweet citrusy and musty aroma of the ripe seeds have been used to flavor sausages, pickles, candies, sauces and soups, and have also been distilled into essential oil. In particular, it is used in elixirs containing harsh purgatives or laxatives such as senna to mask the flavor and to moderate its propensity to cause intense cramping. Much of the traditional uses for coriander center around its carminative and stomachic activities as it has been employed to support digestion and to stimulate appetite in a variety of cultures and countries for thousands of years. A variety of sources suggest coriander’s properties as a relaxant as well, and in Maud Grieve’s words in her book the Modern Herbal “If used too freely the seeds become narcotic.”

In Ayurvedic medicine (traditional healing system of India) coriander is often combined with caraway and cardamom seeds for use as a digestive tonic. It is energetically cooling and has a sweet, bitter and pungent taste. Similarly, in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), coriander is considered pungent in taste. It is used as a digestive tonic as well and as a flavoring to improve the taste of herbal preparations just as it has been in herbal medicine practices in the West.

Disclaimers and Release of Liability Statement

I am not a doctor. I hold no certifications or licenses. Any medical claims are based on my own herbal studies. All products are NOT approved or evaluated by the FDA. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease or illness. Traditional folk medicine is my inspiration. I encourage you to do your own research and come to your own conclusions before partaking of any substance, natural or otherwise. By purchasing this product, you are releasing the maker/manufacturer from product liability and assuming all risks and liability for your own health and well-being.

All products are homemade using sterile instruments and the highest of standards in regard to clean environment and utensils. My products are organically sourced from farmers and wholesalers who produce, cultivate, and clean according to organic standards. These spices, herbs, and teas are produced in full accordance to organic standards but cannot be labeled as certified organic because my facility is not certified for organic production. Any ingredient that is NOT organic will be marked with a (*).

Witchy Gypsy Momma does not guarantee the outcome of any spell or ritual work completed with the use or our products. We believe that it’s your intention alone, not ours, that makes for a successful spell. We only supply products to better enable you on your path of magic. Furthermore, it’s important to say that, by law, we make no claims and sell these products only as accessories to your altar and home.

Additional information

Weight 1.27 oz
Dimensions 8 × 5.5 × 2 in
Net Product Weight

1 oz

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